endless m.liss

same as it ever was

dean0208:

The Kuba Komet.   This is the Kuba Komet from Germany.   The KUBA Corporation manufactured the Komet from 1957 to 1962 in Wolfenbuttel, West Germany. These were kind of an early version of the entertainment center, as there were 8 speakers embedded in this along with a record player, a radio, and a TV tuner in the  bottom cabinet. For an extra charge you could also get a early version of a type of tape recorder and a Remote control with UHF tuner.  Another cool feature of these sets was the ability to swivel the top as you can see in the above picture. Komets were not small by any means. The set stands approx. 5′ 7″ tall, it’s over 7′ wide and weighs about 300 pounds. The cost then was approximately $700 – $1,250.00 US.

(via brucesterling)

librarysleevefacing:

Since he doesn’t have a BGSU ID, Charles Mingus appreciates the opportunity to use one of the two Macs that let visitors browse the web without sign in.

librarysleevefacing:

Since he doesn’t have a BGSU ID, Charles Mingus appreciates the opportunity to use one of the two Macs that let visitors browse the web without sign in.

borlax:

tfwnojutsu:

thatruskieyakattack:

completed-nihilism:

Vantablack

British researchers have created the ‘new black’ of the science world - and it is being dubbed super black.

The material absorbs all but 0.035 per cent of light, a new world record, and is so dark the human eye struggles to discern its shape and dimension, giving the appearance of a black hole.

Named Vantablack, or super black, it also conducts heat seven and half times more effectively than copper, and is ten times stronger than steel.

It is created by Surrey NanoSystems using carbon nanotubes, which are 10,000 thinner than human hair and so miniscule that light cannot get in but can pass into the gaps in between.

Article

i don’t like this

so where can I get a vantablack tshirt

(via seth--rogen)

(Source: cokirk, via startrekgifs)

The hard part of teaching is coming to grips with this:

There is never enough.

There is never enough time. There are never enough resources. There is never enough you.

As a teacher, you can see what a perfect job in your classroom would look like. You know all the assignments you should be giving. You know all the feedback you should be providing your students. You know all the individual crafting that should provide for each individual’s instruction. You know all the material you should be covering. You know all the ways in which, when the teachable moment emerges (unannounced as always), you can greet it with a smile and drop everything to make it grow and blossom.

You know all this, but you can also do the math. 110 papers about the view of death in American Romantic writing times 15 minutes to respond with thoughtful written comments equals — wait! what?! That CAN’T be right! Plus quizzes to assess where we are in the grammar unit in order to design a new remedial unit before we craft the final test on that unit (five minutes each to grade). And that was before Chris made that comment about Poe that offered us a perfect chance to talk about the gothic influences, and then Alex and Pat started a great discussion of gothic influences today. And I know that if my students are really going to get good at writing, they should be composing something at least once a week. And if I am going to prepare my students for life in the real world, I need to have one of my own to be credible.

If you are going to take any control of your professional life, you have to make some hard, conscious decisions. What is it that I know I should be doing that I am not going to do?

Every year you get better. You get faster, you learn tricks, you learn which corners can more safely be cut, you get better at predicting where the student-based bumps in the road will appear. A good administrative team can provide a great deal of help.

But every day is still educational triage. You will pick and choose your battles, and you will always be at best bothered, at worst haunted, by the things you know you should have done but didn’t. Show me a teacher who thinks she’s got everything all under control and doesn’t need to fix a thing for next year, and I will show you a lousy teacher. The best teachers I’ve ever known can give you a list of exactly what they don’t do well enough yet.

—   

From one of the best essays we’ve read on teaching in a while.

The Hard Part

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/peter-greene/the-hardest-part-teaching_b_5554448.html

(via weareteachers)

This. A million times this.

(via hisnamewasbeanni)

so very, very true

(via sslibrarianship)

(via sslibrarianship)

Guy puts a sign out asking people to help sharpie his old Volkswagen, the result is awesome.

daleks2dope:

daisyazuras:

emdefmek:

image

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image

http://imgur.com/a/4S2zN

I hope he clear coated that so the sharpie doesn’t wash away.

and you’re telling me not a single person drew a dick

(via truckin72)

always reblog
word cloud of information literacy instruction goals 2013-2014
popculturebrain:

Ron Swanson found as a marble statue in Philadelphia | Warming Glow

popculturebrain:

Ron Swanson found as a marble statue in Philadelphia | Warming Glow

(via sslibrarianship)

thelibraryperson:

theannfoster:

I really like this library display I made today for our DVD collection.

Clean lines, very eye catching, and makes you want to investigate the collection.  Nicely done!

thelibraryperson:

theannfoster:

I really like this library display I made today for our DVD collection.

Clean lines, very eye catching, and makes you want to investigate the collection.  Nicely done!

(via sslibrarianship)

tastefullyoffensive:

[nyxtro]